Pluto, the Dwarf Planet

Photo Credit: NASA July 13, 2015

Photo Credit: NASA July 13, 2015

Growing up, we had nine planets in our solar system. Information received through various means led scientists to vote in 2006 and reclassify the small, outer orb as a Dwarf Planet. (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/08/060824-pluto-planet.html)

With all the information coming in from the New Horizons probe, Pluto still isn’t a fully-sized planet. We won’t be adding it back in to the “nine” planets of our solar system. (http://space.io9.com/pluto-is-something-way-more-awesome-than-a-mere-planet-1719807379)

NASA has a growing collection of photos of Pluto and of the team whose work sent New Horizons on its mission and has been receiving back telemetry from the probe. (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/images/index.html)

To get a grasp on how large the dwarf is, IFLScience found a tweet from Nathan Lee whose friend David Murray makes the comparison visually for us all to enjoy. Pluto’s diameter is a bit shorter across than Australia.
(http://www.iflscience.com/space/and-now-see-pluto-little-differently)

Our moon’s diameter is about 27.3% the size of Earth’s. Pluto’s diameter is about 18.5% that of Earth’s. It seems pretty clear that the icy dwarf planet will keeps its classification. (http://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/recent-measurements-of-pluto-and-charon-obtained-by-new-horizons)

Of course, Pluto memes are taking over the Internet, and it’s mostly in good fun. (http://uproxx.com/gammasquad/2015/07/best-pluto-memes/2/)

Fellow writer and SFFA member, Martin Palazzotto created his own cartoon in honor of Pluto.

The writer side of me can’t help but wonder, though. What if we, living here on Earth, were suddenly declassified by some larger entity that decided we were too small? It wouldn’t affect us in our daily lives. So let’s go and translate that to Pluto. What if a civilization of ice creatures lived there? What would their lives be like? Would they consider themselves to be the coolest beings in the solar system?

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